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arrakiswitch

A Reciprocal Love Affair With Books

Jean, 39, lover of sci-fi, horror and fantasy, reader of comic books, conqueror of genre fiction.

Daredevil vol. 13: The Murdock Papers by Bendis & Maleev

Daredevil, Vol. 13: The Murdock Papers - Alex Maleev, Brian Michael Bendis

An absolutely fantastic high note to end on, with a surprisingly inevitable conclusion that refuses to "comics" its way out of the hole that Matt has pretty much dug himself into. Anytime there's a ton of Elektra, I'm happy, and this run was good to Natasha, too (though I remember being hugely amused by the banter, and now it just makes me cringe. I never want to read the term 'ninja skank' again.)

 

This review took me a while to build to, and it wasn't because of the material, but because, the more and more I thought about it, the more I realized I wanted to write about hero worship. Though I'd read comics all throughout the 90's, specifically X-Men and anything else I could get my hands on from Marvel, it wasn't until the early 2000's that I found comics that really changed me.

 

The Marvel Knights imprint was a huge part of this. I actually own all of Ennis' Punisher, every volume, which, even when I was young and slightly spoiled by my parents, was an indulgence. But I've read them to death, and they had me convinced, for a long time, that Ennis could do no wrong. This is... obviously not true. The MAX extension of his run on Punisher taught me that, though that's still pretty exceptional, it began to miss his humor. And then I read Crossed and realized that his sense of humor had just become laughing at every and anyone who was offended and/or sick at the extreme ideas he keeps throwing at you.

 

Between Bendis' run on Daredevil and the Marvel Knights Elektra that he penned, I had the same sort of blind admiration for him. Of course, reading Daredevil now from the beginning, older and more mature, and not just infatuated with what he was doing I see the many cracks in the facade. But is that necessarily a bad thing. It doesn't dim my enjoyment of it, though I did get that WHAT WAS I THINKING? feeling an awful lot. It doesn't change the way it hit me back then, or what it meant to me, or even my desire to reread it. Being able to see it critically is actually a boon to the material.

 

And, hey! At least they're not Gail Simone, whose writing never let me down, but her fervent defense of Barbara regaining the ability to walk, and the way she interacted with disabled fans about it, turned me off of her personally, and that is much, much worse.